Posts Tagged ‘riding’

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Bugs, Flies, and Parasites – OH MY!

May 7th, 2015

Keep your Horse Safe from Pests this Season

Whispering Hope Stables is a premier horse boarding facility located 10 minutes from downtown Raleigh and our primary focus is to provide top horse care to all of our horses at WHS.

Spring is such important time of year, because it is the start of an equestrian’s riding and training season. You always want to make sure that your horse has the best transition into spring and maintains optimal health from flies and parasites!

At Whispering Hope Stables, we provide the best possible horse care throughout the year, no matter the season. We have adopted certain practices and procedures to keep our horses in the best possible health.

 

Fly Management

Whispering Hope Stables uses natural and organic methods to fight flies during the spring and summer. Flies are not only a nuisance, but some biting species like the “stable fly” can be painful to a horse and transmit diseases like equine infectious anemia (EIA).

Fly predators are tiny insects that do not bite or sting. They find and kill roughly 75 pest fly pupae before they hatch into pest or stable flies and they can travel around 150 feet. These little predators are virtually unnoticeable and they spend their entire life cycle in fly breeding areas like manure piles or rotting organic matter.Fly predator

We have been using Spalding Fly Predators for the past 3 years at Whispering Hope Stables and have been greatly pleased with the results. They significantly minimize the number of pest and stable flies. If you are going to use fly spray this season, we recommend you read the warnings and avoid dosing yourself while spraying your horse.

 

 

Deworming

In addition to Fly Management, the staff at Whispering Hope Stables deworms all horses twice a year, rotating the type of dewormer medication. The purpose of deworming is to decrease and eliminate the number of parasites in the intestines and colon. When temperatures rise in the spring, internal parasites boost their egg production. More eggs in the intestines or colon can potentially increase the risk of internal parasite infection, intestinal damage, and even colic.

We want to ensure the best care for each horse at Whispering Hope Stables and one way we do this is deworming. We request and arrange for our members’ veterinarians to pull fecal samples the month before deworming. Fecal samples are tested by the veterinarian in a laboratory to determine the fecal egg count. This is the number of eggs passing in each gram of manure, measured as eggs per gram (EPG).

When the test results come back, the number helps your veterinarian determine the type of dewormer. If the fecal egg count in a horse is less than 200-250 EPG, then the horse is showing a natural immunity and overall a low parasite load; your horse would then be considered a “low-shedder”.  However, if the test results for your horse come back with a number higher than 200-250 EPG, then your horse may have a high parasite load or considered a “chronic shedder” or “high-shedder”.

Horses which are chronic or high shedders may simply need to be dewormed more often than other horses to keep the parasite load down. For high shedder horses, veterinarians will usually recommend taking another fecal sample 10-14 days after the deworming. The results from this second fecal egg count enable the veterinarian to determine if there was any resistance to the dewormer medication and how often the horse will need deworming that year.

Some horses may need to be dewormed more often than others depending on the climate, geographic location, and fecal egg count. Most veterinarians will recommend that you deworm your horse at least twice a year, in the Spring and Fall, no matter the results from the fecal egg count. Dewormer medication also helps eliminate or decrease tapeworms and bots.

These are some of the practices that we have implemented at Whispering Hope Stables to minimize, manage, and eliminate pests and parasites. At Whispering Hope Stables, we want our members to enjoy their ride and know that their horse is receiving the best care possible.

 

Author Information:   Madeline Gioja, Office Manager at Whispering Hope Stables

To learn more about Whispering Hope Stables, please call (919) 851-6237 or email Madeline@whisperinghopestables.com.

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Leaving a Legacy

December 17th, 2014

Whispering Hope Stables is a horse boarding facility nestled just 10 minutes from downtown Raleigh and we focus on horse care and developing a community of people where joy, kindness, and understanding prevail. A member and friend of Whispering Hope Stables, Judy Humphries was informed of shocking news that would cause most people to lose hope and stop living life.

“Ovarian cancer,” said the doctor. It was December 24th, 2008.

That evening after hearing the news, Judy sat quietly contemplating what she really wanted to do before she left this earth. Jon Gordon, an American author and consultant, once stated, “Every one of us is going to leave a legacy. It just depends on what kind.” This was the exact question she was facing.

She did not have an answer yet about whether she would fight the cancer, and she wanted to focus on the things left for her to accomplish in life. Was there anything left she wanted to accomplish? At that moment, she decided she wanted to get back into horses.

Judy had ridden horses when she was a child, but the riding had been more about the technique and training. She had not really focused on building a relationship with the horse, and she had never had that special bond. She so desired that special relationship.

After the diagnosis, Judy chose to not focus too much on the cancer but on horses!

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And so her journey began with leasing a horse. She quickly got into the groove of grooming and riding again and soon she was longing for a horse of her own. A good friend found a mare that she believed could be a partner and companion along this journey with Judy.

The mare was named Peppy Cayenne and she had her own baggage. She was skittish and little leery of people. This mare needed love and attention, and someone to teach her to trust again.  Judy decided to open her heart and family and made Peppy a part of her journey!

Peppy was a turning point for Judy. Judy spent the next year establishing a trusting relationship with Peppy, and getting her healthy and happy. Peppy started to come to life and bring such joy to Judy. Through the cancer treatments, Peppy also provided a distraction and a reason to get up and go every week.

In 2013, Judy realized she wanted more from this experience of getting back into horses. Together, Judy and her husband, Wofford, decided to breed Peppy.

Peppy is a full bred Quarter Horse, and Judy decided to work with the Quarter Horse Foundation and find a stallion that would help continue the true breeding lines for Quarter Horses. Her goal and journey of getting back into horses was becoming a legacy. She was deciding to give back to the breed that gave so much to her.

The 11-month pregnancy brought Judy and Peppy infinitely closer. Judy was there for every ultrasound and injection, and she regularly massaged and hosed Peppy’s legs when she would stock up. When Peppy delivered, the baby came quickly and easily, and Judy was actually able to be in the stall immediately after the delivery.

Unlike most horses, Peppy did not mind that Judy was in the stall at all. She was not protective or aggressive toward Judy in the least bit. She trusted Judy explicitly with her new foul. With tears in her eyes, Judy shared, “It is a special place of bonding. It is a privilege to share that moment with the mom.”

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Upon his arrival, the black foul was named, “Legacy”. His name had a two-fold meaning, because this was a legacy for both Peppy and herself. Legacy has become one of the most meaningful and rewarding accomplishments in Judy’s life. Judy and Peppy’s story is an inspiration to many at Whispering Hope Stables.

As we approach the end of 2014 and as you live out life, what is the legacy that you wish to leave? Will you chose to leave a legacy of hope and life?

This upcoming year in 2015, I challenge you to make every effort to do the thing you really want in life. Leave your legacy!

Judy Humphries is one of our faithful members at Whispering Hope Stables. She expresses a sincere love for people and her horses in everything that she does at the stables. She is still fighting cancer to this day. Every day, she chooses to bring warmth and joy to people’s hearts by creating a positive and loving environment around her.

 

Written by: Madeline Gioja

Office Manager, Whispering Hope Stables